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Fairchild 100

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Title: Fairchild 100  
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Fairchild 100

Fairchild 100
American/Fairchild Y1C-24, c. 1932
Role Airliner
National origin United States of America
Manufacturer Fairchild Aircraft
Designer Virginius E. Clark
First flight 1930
Introduction 1931
Primary user American Airlines
Number built 27

The Fairchild 100 was a single engined monoplane with high-mounted wings and was the continuation of a series of utility transport aircraft built by Fairchild Aircraft.

Contents

  • Design and development 1
  • Operational history 2
  • Variants 3
  • Survivors 4
  • Specifications (Y1C-24) 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Design and development

The 100 was similar in design to the Fairchild C-8 and was basically an enlarged version of it.

The first flight of the aircraft (NC754Y) was October 22, 1930. Although only one aircraft was completed, a modified version also known as the Pilgrim 100-A was in production for American Airways, the first operator of the type in 1931. After a total of 16 aircraft, an additional batch of 10 aircraft with a larger fin were manufactured by the re-structured American Aircraft & Engine Corporation that emerged in 1931 from the Fairchild Aircraft Co. The continuing series was built under the designations, Pilgrim 100-B and American/Fairchild Y1C-24. The first six in the new series went to American Airways. The parent company later reinstated the Fairchild name.

Operational history

The sturdy Fairchild 100 series served as both an airliner and a bush plane. In 1932, the US Army Air Corps bought four Pilgrim Model 100-Bs designated the Y1C-24 and were initially assigned as light cargo transport and supply aircraft. [1]

After a short time in service, the Y1C-24s were adapted for use as aeromedical evacuation aircraft, carrying up to four litter patients. The aircraft were assigned to pilot training and pursuit aircraft airfields for use as crash rescue aircraft. Exploiting the Y1C-24's ability to takeoff and land in a relatively short distance, the Y1C-24s remained in service into the late 1930s when they were replaced by newer air ambulance aircraft. [1]

Variants

Pilgrim 100-A (NC709Y) at Alaska Aviation Heritage Museum
Pilgrim 100
Prototype of the Pilgrim 100 family, powered by a 575 hp (429 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp. designed by Virginius Clark, one built.
Pilgrim 100-A
aka American Pilgrim, powered by a 575 hp (429 kW) Pratt & Whitney Hornet B, derived directly from the Fairchild 100. Sixteen were built, all of which were operated by American Airways.
Pilgrim 100-B
Powered by a 575 hp (429 kW) Wright R-1820 Cyclone B, 10 built, of which 6 for American Airways, and 4 to the US Army as the Fairchild Y1C-24.
Fairchild Y1C-24
Military designation for the US Army Y1C-24, 4 built, powered by 575 hp (429 kW) Wright R-1820-1 Cyclone engines.
Pilgrim Y1C-24
Alternative military designation for the US Army Y1C-24.

Survivors

Pilgrim 100-B N709Y is one of a few surviving aircraft from the early days of aviation in the history of Alaska. At the time of its listing on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986, it was the last Pilgrim that was still flightworthy.[2] It is now in the collection of the Alaska Aviation Heritage Museum.

Specifications (Y1C-24)

Data from United States Military Aircraft since 1909 [3]

General characteristics
  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 9 passengers
  • Length: 39 ft 2 in (11.94 m)
  • Wingspan: 57 ft 0 in (17.38 m)
  • Wing area: 459 ft2 (42.7 m2)
  • Empty weight: 4,195 lb (1,907 kg)
  • Gross weight: 7,070 lb (3,214 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright R-1820-1 Cyclone, 575 hp (429 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 135 mph (217 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 118[1] mph (190 km/h)
  • Range: 510[1] miles (821 km)
  • Service ceiling: 13,600[1] ft (4,150 m)

References

Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e "Fact Sheets: American Y1C-24." nationalmuseum.af.mil. Retrieved: 15 August 2009.
  2. ^ "NRHP nomination for Pilgrim 100B Aircraft". National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 
  3. ^ Swanborough and Bowers 1963, p. 481.
Bibliography
  • "Fairchild 100." Aerofiles. Retrieved: 15 August 2009.
  • Swanborough, F.G. and Peter M. Bowers. United States Military Aircraft since 1909. London: Putnam, 1963. ISBN 0-85177-816-X.

External links

  • Photo
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