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Eugene Puryear

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Title: Eugene Puryear  
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Subject: Party for Socialism and Liberation, Comparison of United States presidential candidates, 2008, List of candidates in the United States presidential election, 2008, United States third party and independent presidential candidates, 2008, United States presidential election, 2008
Collection: 1986 Births, African-American United States Vice-Presidential Candidates, American Anti–iraq War Activists, D.C. Statehood Green Party Politicians, Howard University Alumni, Living People, Party for Socialism and Liberation Politicians, People from Charlottesville, Virginia, United States Vice-Presidential Candidates, 2008, United States Vice-Presidential Candidates, 2016
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Eugene Puryear

Eugene Puryear
Personal details
Born (1986-02-28) February 28, 1986
Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.
Political party D.C. Statehood Green Party,
Party for Socialism and Liberation
Alma mater Howard University
Occupation Journalist, activist
Website eugenepuryear.com

Eugene Puryear (born February 28, 1986 in Charlottesville, Virginia) is an American activist who is currently a candidate for the At-Large seat in the DC Council with the D.C. Statehood Green Party. Puryear was also the vice presidential nominee of the Party for Socialism and Liberation (PSL) in the 2008 United States presidential election.[1]

Contents

  • Campaign for Washington, D.C. City Council 1
  • Activism 2
  • Vice Presidential campaign 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5
  • External links 6

Campaign for Washington, D.C. City Council

Puryear is running in 2014, as a D.C. Statehood Green Party candidate, for the At-Large City Council seat currently held by Anita Bonds.[2] His campaign has put forward a 10-point program, which describes some policy positions taken by the Howard University graduate. On April 1, 2014, Puryear won the party's nomination, defeating G. Lee Aikin, 67.3% to 25.1%.[3] On November 4, 2014, Puryear placed third out of 14 candidates in the general election. [4]

Activism

Puryear studied at Israeli blockade of Gaza.[6] He also writes for the PSL's newspaper and journal. Puryear and the ANSWER coalition were involved in the campaign to free the Jena 6.[7] As a freshman at Howard in 2005, Puryear was interviewed by the Washington Post as an "activist-in-training" and cited his engagement with activism against gentrification, racism, the US occupation of Iraq and other issues.[8] In November 2010, RT interviewed Puryear regarding socialism in the United States.

Vice Presidential campaign

In 2008, Puryear ran on the Party for Socialism and Liberation's ticket alongside presidential nominee Gloria La Riva. The La Riva/Puryear slate was on the ballot in six states and received 6,818 total votes.[9]

References

  1. ^ Meet Eugene Puryear at pslweb.org, accessed 9 June 2008,
  2. ^ Sommer, Will (January 30, 2014). "Ward Candidates Meet in First Debate".  
  3. ^ April 1, 2014 Primary Election Results
  4. ^ November 4, 2014 General Election Results
  5. ^ Johnson, Jenna (August 16, 2007). "Antiwar Group Refuses To Back Down on Signs".  
  6. ^ "Thousands descend on White House to protest Gaza war".  
  7. ^ Simmons, Christine. Jena 6' protesters demand action by Justice Department"'".  
  8. ^ Pierre, Robert E. (February 22, 2005). "Rekindling Howard U.'s Activist Fire".  
  9. ^ Winger, Richard. "Party for Socialism and Liberation Announces Presidential Nominee". Ballot-acces.org. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 

Further reading

  • Miller, Talea (August 2, 2007). "Iraq War Impacts Enrollment of Blacks in Military". PBS. Retrieved December 2, 2011. 
  • "Thousands descend on White House to protest Gaza war". Channelnewsasia.com. January 11, 2009. Retrieved December 2, 2011. 

External links

  • PSL 2008 campaign website
  • D.C. City Council 2014 campaign website
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