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Elkhorn City, Kentucky

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Title: Elkhorn City, Kentucky  
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Elkhorn City, Kentucky

Elkhorn City, Kentucky
City
Nickname(s): "Gateway to the Breaks"
Location in Pike County and the state of Kentucky.
Location in Pike County and the state of Kentucky.
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Kentucky
County Pike
Incorporated November 4, 1912
Government
 • Type Mayor-Council
 • Mayor Mike Taylor
Area
 • Total 2.0 sq mi (5.2 km2)
 • Land 2.0 sq mi (5.2 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 791 ft (241 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 1,060
 • Density 525.5/sq mi (202.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 41522
Area code(s) 606
FIPS code 21-24382
GNIS feature ID 0491688
Website http://www.elkhorncity.org/

Elkhorn City is a 4th-class city in Pike County, Kentucky, in the United States. The population was 1,060 at the 2000 census. The city is located in proximity to the Breaks Interstate Park.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Climate 2.1
  • Demographics 3
  • Notable people 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

History

Elkhorn City was first settled by William Ramey of North Carolina c. 1810. However, in 1767-1768, Daniel Boone took his first steps in what is now Kentucky near present-day Elkhorn City on a hunting expedition.[1]

It was originally named Elkhorn, after an revival there in August 1881. In 1907, the C&O Railroad established a station in Praise that was named Elkhorn City. Although Elkhorn City was incorporated as a city on November 4, 1912, the local post office was not renamed Elkhorn City until September 1, 1952, after local pressure for a uniform name.[3]

The neighboring settlement of Cedarville merged with Elkhorn City in 2009.[4]

Geography

Elkhorn City is located at (37.3039971, -82.3509795 ).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.2 km2), all land.

Elkhorn City is nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains of Eastern Kentucky. The city has many geographic wonders that make it one of the major tourism destinations in Kentucky. First and foremost of these natural wonders is the Russell Fork of the Big Sandy River which flows through the center of the city. It is well known for as a whitewater rafting destination, featuring Class II-VI rapids.[6]

Elkhorn City is also geographically located at the northernmost point of the Pine Mountain along with the northern terminus of Pine Mountain Trail.[7] Once completed, the trail will extend from the Breaks Interstate Park to Cumberland Gap National Historical Park along the ridge of Pine Mountain.[8]

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Elkhorn City has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[9]

Climate data for Elkhorn City, Kentucky
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 78
(26)
83
(28)
89
(32)
92
(33)
98
(37)
100
(38)
101
(38)
100
(38)
102
(39)
90
(32)
85
(29)
80
(27)
102
(39)
Average high °F (°C) 42
(6)
47
(8)
56
(13)
66
(19)
73
(23)
80
(27)
83
(28)
82
(28)
77
(25)
67
(19)
57
(14)
45
(7)
64.6
(18.1)
Average low °F (°C) 23
(−5)
26
(−3)
32
(0)
40
(4)
49
(9)
59
(15)
63
(17)
62
(17)
55
(13)
43
(6)
33
(1)
26
(−3)
42.6
(5.9)
Record low °F (°C) −14
(−26)
−12
(−24)
−3
(−19)
21
(−6)
25
(−4)
40
(4)
40
(4)
45
(7)
34
(1)
19
(−7)
9
(−13)
−11
(−24)
−14
(−26)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.19
(81)
3.20
(81.3)
3.43
(87.1)
4.06
(103.1)
4.89
(124.2)
4.50
(114.3)
5.20
(132.1)
3.86
(98)
3.14
(79.8)
2.82
(71.6)
2.91
(73.9)
3.27
(83.1)
44.47
(1,129.5)
Source: The Weather Channel.[10]

Demographics

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 1,060 people, 437 households, and 295 families residing in the city. The population density was 525.5 people per square mile (202.6/km²). There were 506 housing units at an average density of 250.8 per square mile (96.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 99.34% White, 0.09% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.75% of the population.

There were 437 households out of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.3% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.75.

In the city the population was spread out with 18.6% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 24.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 81.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $22,963, and the median income for a family was $27,237. Males had a median income of $30,139 versus $18,750 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,323. About 18.0% of families and 19.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.9% of those under age 18 and 11.8% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

  • Patty Loveless, country music singer
  • Rexanna Wright-Carlson, Master Needlework artist
  • Steve "Catdaddy" Ruth Award winning writer, musician, radio personality, and Elkhorn City Adventure Tourism Liaison.
  • Republik Steele. Bluegrass Band signed to Rural Rhythm Records and named after a now-defunct coal mine in honor of the people who worked there, the band holds The Key To The City, awarded in 2012. The band includes three Elkhorn City natives: Kenny O'Quinn, David Adkins, and Danny Ray Stiltner.

See also

References

  1. ^ Historical Marker Society of America. "Daniel Boone's First Steps in Kentucky (2203)". Accessed 7 Dec 2010.
  2. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (1987). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. p. 91. Retrieved 2013-04-28. 
  3. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (1988). "Place Names". Kentucky Place Names.   Retrieved on 2010-04-09
  4. ^ "Geographic Boundary Change Notes". Population Division,  
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  6. ^ Fork River Rafting Trips Retrieved on 2010-12-07
  7. ^ Hiking/Mountain Biking in Elkhorn City Retrieved on 2010-12-07
  8. ^ Pine Mountain Trail Conference Retrieved on 2010-12-07
  9. ^ Climate Summary for Elkhorn City, Kentucky
  10. ^ "Monthly Averages for Elkhorn City, KY".  
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  13. ^ "American FactFinder".  

External links

  • Pike County Tourism
  • Breaks Interstate Park
  • Elkhorn City Railroad Museum
  • Russell Fork River
  • Elkhorn City Area Observer
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