Durban Moment

The Durban Moment refers to the period in the early 1970s when the South African city of Durban became the centre of a new vibrancy in the struggle against apartheid. The two central figures in this moment were Steve Biko and Richard Turner – the former was closely associated with the Black Consciousness Movement and the latter with the trade union movement.[1] The two were in a reading group together. Both were influenced by the new left and had links to radical Christian circles.[2]

References

  1. ^ van Holdt, Karl (2011). "The Johannesburg Moment: Open Address at the Mail & Guardian Literary Festival". Books Live. Retrieved 25 May 2012. 
  2. ^ Macqueen, Ian (2011). Re-imagining South Africa: Black Consciousness, radical Christianity and the New Left, 1967–1977 (PhD Thesis).  

External links

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