World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Decet Romanum Pontificem

Article Id: WHEBN0002726794
Reproduction Date:

Title: Decet Romanum Pontificem  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Martin Luther, Exsurge Domine, 1521 works, Acclamation (Papal elections), January 3
Collection: 1521 Works, 1596 Works, 1622 Works, 16Th-Century Papal Bulls, Documents of Pope Leo X, Martin Luther
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Decet Romanum Pontificem

Not to be confused with Romanum decet pontificem.
Decet Romanum Pontificem

Decet Romanum Pontificem (English: It Pleases the Roman Pontiff) (1521) is the papal bull excommunicating Martin Luther, bearing the title of the first three Latin words of the text.[1] It was issued on January 3, 1521, by Pope Leo X to effect the excommunication threatened in his earlier papal bull Exsurge Domine (1520) since Luther failed to recant.[2] Luther had burned his copy of Exsurge Domine on December 10, 1520, at the Elster Gate in Wittenberg, indicating his response to it.

There are at least two other important papal bulls with the title Decet Romanum Pontificem: one dated February 23, 1596, issued by Pope Clement VIII, and one dated March 12, 1622, issued by Pope Gregory XV.

Toward the end of the 20th century, Lutherans in dialogue with the Catholic Church requested the lifting of this excommunication; however, the Vatican's response was that its practice is to lift excommunications only on those still living. Roland Bainton in "Here I Stand after a Quarter of a Century," his preface for the 1978 edition of his Luther biography, concludes: "I am happy that the Church of Rome has allowed some talk of removing the excommunication of Luther. This might well be done. He was never a heretic. He might better be called, as one has phrased it, 'a reluctant rebel.'" Luther's rehabilitation has been denied however by the Vatican: "Rumors that the Vatican is set to rehabilitate Martin Luther, the 16th-century leader of the Protestant Reformation, are groundless," said the Vatican spokesman, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi.[3]

Notes

  1. ^ Papal Encyclicals Online. - Leo X Excommunicates Martin Luther - Rome, 1521 January 3rd""Decet Romanum Pontificem""The Bull . Retrieved 2012-10-30. 
  2. ^ Doak (2006) p. 12
  3. ^ Vatican spokesman calls rumors of rehabilitation of Luther groundless Catholic News Service, March 10 2008

References

  • Doak, Robin (2006). Pope Leo X. Minneapolis: Compass Point Books.  

External links

  • Papal Encyclicals Online. - Leo X Excommunicates Martin Luther - Rome, 1521 January 3rd""Decet Romanum Pontificem""The Bull . Retrieved 2012-10-30. 
  • Decet Romanum PontificemText of (Microsoft Word format)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.