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Climate of Ecuador

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Climate of Ecuador

The climate of Ecuador varies by region, due to differences in altitude and, to a degree, in proximity to the equator.[1]

The coastal lowlands in the western part of Ecuador are typically warm with temperatures in the region of 25 °C (77 °F).[2] Coastal areas are affected by ocean currents and between January and April are hot and rainy.[3]

The weather in Quito is consistent to that of a subtropical highland climate. The city has a fairly constant cool climate due to its elevation. The average temperature during the day is 66 °F (18.9 °C), which generally falls to an average of 50 °F (10 °C) at night. The average temperature annually is 64 °F (17.8 °C) There are only really two obvious seasons in the city: dry and wet. The dry season (summer) runs from June to Sept. and the wet season (winter) is from October to May. As most of Ecuador is in the southern hemisphere, June to Sept. is considered to be winter, and winter is generally the dry season in warm climates. Spring, summer, and fall are generally the "wet seasons" while winter is the dry {with exception of the first month of fall being dry.}

Ecuador lies directly on the equator, so the entire country enjoys 12 hours of direct equatorial daylight 365 days a year. However, the climate you will experience depends largely on where you are in Ecuador, since there are four distinct geographical areas—the Sierra (mountains), the Oriente (eastern rainforests), the Costa (Pacific coastal plains), and the Galapagos Islands.

For example, Ecuador’s capital, Quito, lies in the Central Valley between the Andean Mountains’ eastern and western ridges. The equator is less than 20 miles north of the city, yet at an altitude of 9,350 feet (2,900 meters), Quito’s climate is spring-like year around: about 50° F (10° C) at night and as high as 76° F (25° C) during the day. The sun makes the difference. You can comfortably stroll out on a glorious Quito afternoon in shorts and a T-shirt, but you’ll need to take your wool sweater in case the clouds roll in. The equatorial sun is intense, but when it’s obscured by clouds, you realize how high in the Andes you really are. In fact, cold weather gear is needed for high altitude hiking and mountain climbing.

The beaches and rainforests, on the other hand, are characterized by the tropical temperatures that one would expect from equatorial lowlands, with highs ranging between 80° F and 90° F. Between these two extremes, just about any type of weather can be found in Ecuador.

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^

External links

  • Ecuador Weather & When to Travel
  • Climate map
  • Description climates for each region
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