World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Big Drum

Article Id: WHEBN0001907513
Reproduction Date:

Title: Big Drum  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of Caribbean membranophones, Carriacou, Music of Saint Kitts and Nevis, Caribbean/Selected article/9, Today's featured article/January 21, 2007
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Big Drum

Big Drum is a genre and a musical instrument from the Windward Islands. It is a kind of Caribbean music, associated mostly closely with the music of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Music of Guadeloupe, Carriacou in Grenada and in the music of Saint Kitts and Nevis.

Contents

  • Origin 1
  • Carriacou 2
  • Guadeloupe 3
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis 4
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7

Origin

All big drum celebration is accompanied by the boula drum. The word boula can refer to at least four different drums played in the Caribbean music area.

The Guadeloupean boula is a hand drum, similar to the tambou bèlè, and is used in gwo ka and special occasions likes wakes, wrestling matches and Carnival celebrations. It is a hand drum that plays low-pitched sounds and is played single-handed and transversally.[1]

The boula of Carriacou is also a hand drum, now most often made of rum casks. It is also called the tambou dibas, and is used in the Big Drum tradition.[2][3]

The boula of Trinidad and Tobago accompanies the stick-fighting dance called kalenda, and is a double-headed barrel drum, played open-handed.[4]

Carriacou

The inhabitants of Carriacou perform the "Big Drum" or "Nation" dance which celebrates their West African ancestors that were brought to the island during slavery. These Big Drum dances are usually performed at "Maroons" village festivals or fetes, where food and drink are prepared. They can also be danced at wakes and tombstone feasts in honor of dead relatives or marriage ceremonies, tombstone raisings, fishing boat launchings and in the case of ill-health or ill-fortune.In each occasion, the main focus is twofold: remembering lineage and respecting ancestors. The music consists of singing and chanting typically joined by three drums, shakers and maracas. [5]

Guadeloupe

Gwo ka is the French creole term for Big drum.

The Guadeloupean boula is a hand drum, similar to the tambou bèlè, and is used in gwo ka and special occasions likes wakes, wrestling matches and Carnival celebrations. It is a hand drum that plays low-pitched sounds and is played single-handed and transversally.[1]

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Big Drum is played in Saint Kitts and Nevis, alongside a kettle drum, during Carnival celebrations.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Vincentian big drums are traditionally made from tree trunks, but are more often made from rum kegs now. The socially aware or satirical lyrics are usually performed by a female singer called a chantwell, and is accompanied by dancers in colorful skirts and headresses. Big Drum is commonly performed at weddings and other celebrations, especially the launches of boats.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Guilbault, Jocelyne (1999). "Guadeloupe". Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Volume Two: South America, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Routledge. pp. 873–880.  
  2. ^ McDaniel, Lorna (1999). "Grenada". Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. Volume 2. Routledge. pp. 865–872.  
  3. ^ "Tombstone - Big Drum - Saraca". Paradise Inn. Retrieved September 10, 2005. 
  4. ^ McDaniel, Lorna (1999). "Trinidad and Tobago". Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Volume Two: South America, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Routledge. pp. 952–967.  
  5. ^ Pearse, Andrew Chernocke. "The Big Drum Dance Of Carriacou". Alexander Street Press. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.