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Bertrade de Montfort

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Bertrade de Montfort

Bertrade de Montfort
Bertrade with Philip
Queen consort of the Franks
Tenure 1092–1108
Born c. 1070
Died 14 February 1117 (aged 46–47)
Spouse Fulk IV, Count of Anjou
Philip I of France
Issue Fulk of Jerusalem
Philip, Count of Mantes
Fleury, Seigneur of Nangis
Cecile, Princess of Galilee
House House of Montfort
Father Simon I de Montfort
Mother Agnes, Countess of Evreux
Religion Roman Catholicism

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070 – 14 February 1117) was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux. Her brother was Amaury de Montfort.

According to the chronicler John of Marmoutier:

The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury de Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty.

Bertrade and Fulk were married, and they became the parents of a son, Fulk, but in 1092 Bertrade left her husband and took up with King Philip I of France. Philip married her on 15 May 1092, despite the fact that they both had spouses living. He was so enamoured of Bertrade that he refused to leave her even when threatened with excommunication. Pope Urban II did excommunicate him in 1095, and Philip was prevented from taking part in the First Crusade. Astonishingly, Bertrade persuaded Philip and Fulk to be friends.

Children

With Fulk IV, Count of Anjou:

With Philip I of France:

Later life

According to Orderic Vitalis, Bertrade was anxious that one of her sons succeed Philip, and sent a letter to King Henry I of England asking him to arrest her stepson Louis. Orderic also claims she sought to kill

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