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Barauni–Katihar section

 

Barauni–Katihar section

Barauni–Katihar section
Overview
Status Operational
Locale Bihar
Termini Barauni
Katihar
Stations 27
Operation
Owner Indian Railway
Operator(s) East Central Railway, Northeast Frontier Railway
Technical
Line length 185 km (115 mi)
Track gauge 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Broad gauge
Barauni-Katihar section
Kms
Kms
 to
Muzaffarpur
& Darbhanga
Samastipur
146
 to Barauni
Bhagwanpur Desua
138
to
Barauni–Gorakhpur,
Raxaul & Jainagar lines
 
Angar Ghat
131
Narhan
124
to Mokama-Barauni section 
Rusera Ghat
119
  0
Barauni 
Mabbi(halt)
116
National Highway 28   
Naya Nagar
111
  5
Bihat 
Barepura(halt)
108
  8
Tilrath 
Hasanpur Road
101
15
Begusarai 
Sashan(halt)
97
23
Lakho 
Garhpura
95
28
Danauli Phulwaria 
Somra Pranpur(halt)
91
33
Lakhminia 
Salauna
86
(halt)
44
Sanaha 
Imli
79
48
Sahibpur Kamal 
Paharaja Gangur(halt)
75
54
Umesh Nagar 
Olapur
71
61
Khagaria 
69
Mansi 
National Highway 31  
(halt)
74
Chedbanni 
80
Maheshkhuntt 
Badlaghat
84
Gauchari 
Kosi River
92
Pasraha 
Dhamara Ghat
(halt)
98
Bharat Khand 
Koparia
104
Narayanpur 
Simri-Bakhtiarpur
State Highway 58  
Baba Raghuni(halt)
112
Thana Bihpur 
Saharsa
(halt)Karu Khirhar Nagar 
Saharsa Kacheri
Baijnathpur 
Panchgachhia
Methai 
Garh Baruwari
Dauran Madhepura 
Veena Ekma(halt)
Budhma 
Supaul
(halt)Bhairopatti 
Kadampura(halt)
(halt)Deenapatti 
Tharbitta
Murliganj 
Baijnathpur Andoli
(halt)Rupauli 
Saraygarh
Janki Nagar 
Narayanpur Murli(halt)
(halt)Harapatti 
Raghopur
Rambisanpur(halt)
National Highway 31  
Pratapganj
to Lattipur 
Lalitgram
120
Kharik 
Chhatapur Road
128
Naugachhia 
Narpatganj
139
Katareah 
Debiganj(halt)
Kosi River 
Chakarha(halt)
145
Kursela 
Jogbani
155
Bakhri 
Bathnaha
Forbesganj
Bihariganj 
Raghubans Nagar 
Dholbazar(halt)
Barhara Kothi 
Gogipothia(halt)
(halt)Sukhshena 
Simraha
Aurahi 
Haldia Bihar(halt)
(halt)Sukhasan Kothi 
Araria
Araria Court
Banmankhi 
Kushiargaon
Sarsi 
Satar(halt)
(halt)Alinagar Tola 
Jalalgarh
Krityanandanagar 
Gharbanali
Purnia Court 
Kasba
162
Karhagola Road 
Purnia
National Highway 31  
Rautara
173
Semapur 
Dalan
185
Katihar 
Manshi 
(halt)Kumaripur 
to Katihar-Siliguri line
Manihari 
Teznarayanpur 
to Kumedpur
Kms

The Barauni–Katihar section of the Barauni–Guwahati line connects Barauni and Katihar in the Indian state of Bihar .

Contents

  • History 1
    • Early developments 1.1
    • Bridge links 1.2
    • Railway reorganization 1.3
  • Locale 2
  • Gauge conversion 3
  • Electrification 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

History

Early developments

Railway development on the northern side of the Ganges in Bihar came up soon after the opening of the Howrah–Delhi main line on the southern side of the Ganges in 1866. Several railway companies were involved – East Indian Railway, Assam Behar State Railway, and Tirhut State Railway. In his book The Indian Empire, Its People, History and Products (first published in 1886) W.W.Hunter, says “The Tirhut State Railway with its various branches intersects Northern Behar and is intended to extend to the Nepal frontier on one side and to Assam on the other.” However, early developments appear to be scattered. EIR built the KatiharKasba and Katihar–Manihari lines in 1887. Assam Behar State Railway built the Parbatipur–Katihar line (see Barsoi–Parbatipur line) in 1889, thereby linking Assam and parts of North Bengal with Bihar. Tirhoot State Railway built some longer lines such as SamastipurKhagaria, and added branch lines such as the 7 miles long Barauni–Semaria Ghat in 1883, the 11 miles long Thana Bihpur to Bararighat in 1901 and Khagaria to Hasanpur Road in 1915. Most of these early metre gauge lines got interconnected in subsequent years.[1][2][3]

Bridge links

The construction of the 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) long Rajendra Setu in 1959 provided the first opportunity to link the railway tracks on the north and south banks of the Ganges.[4]

The 3.19 kilometres (1.98 mi) long rail-cum-road bridge located at Munger 55 km downstream of the Rajendra Setu, now under construction, will link Jamalpur station on the Sahibganj Loop line of Eastern Railway to the Barauni–Katihar section of East Central Railway.[5]

Railway reorganization

The Avadh–Tirhut Railway (successor to Tirhut State Railway) was merged with Assam Railway (successor to Eastern Bengal Railway and Assam Bengal Railway) in 1952 to create North Eastern Railway. Northeast Frontier Railway was carved out of North Eastern Railway in 1958.[6] East Central Railway was constituted in 2002 with the Sonpur and Samastipur Divisions of North Eastern Railway, and Danapur, Mughalsarai and Dhanbad Divisions of Eastern Railway.[7]

Locale

The entire track lies on the northern side of the Ganges and traverses the Kosi basin. In Bihar, the Kosi is widely referred to as the “Sorrow of Bihar” as it has caused widespread human suffering over the centuries through flooding and frequent changes in course. Over the last 250 years, the Kosi has shifted its course over 120 kilometres (75 mi) from east to west. In August 2008, it picked up an old channel it had abandoned over a century ago near the Nepal–India border, and caused enormous damage in a wide area covering several districts. The breach in the Kosi embankment which caused the devastating flood in 2008, was repaired in 2009 and the river has since been flowing along its original course.[8] The floods continue and threaten even the Barauni–Katihar tracks. The entire region portrays “a bleak picture of broken houses, flattened fields and ravaged lives, signs of all the havoc the previous floods and land erosion wreaked here earlier.”[9]

Gauge conversion

Gauge conversion work (from metre gauge to broad gauge) in the Barauni–Katihar section was taken up in 1978-79 and completed in 1982.[10]

Electrification

Electrification of the 809 kilometres (503 mi) long Barauni–Katihar–Guwahati section was sanctioned in 2008.[11] As of 2011, work on electrification of Barabanki–Gorakhpur–Barauni–New Jalpaiguri route was in progress. Adequate funds have been provided in the budget for 2011–12 to take up work in the New Jalapiguri–New Bongaigaon–Guwahati section.[12]

References

  1. ^ R. P. Saxena. "Indian Railway History Time line". Irse.bravehost.com. Retrieved 4 January 2014. 
  2. ^ Sir William Wilson Hunter (1886). The Indian Empire Its People, History, and Products. Asian Educational Services. p. 547.  
  3. ^ "Indian Railways line history 2. North Eastern Railway". Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  4. ^ "Indian railways history (after independence)". Indian Railways. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  5. ^ "Trains in India". PPPNOW.com. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  6. ^ "Northeast Frontier Railways". Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  7. ^ "Geography – Railway Zones". IRFCA. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  8. ^ "Kosi River (कोसी नदी) – The Sorrow of Bihar". Gits4U.com. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  9. ^ "Hungry Kosi scares villages". The Telegraph, 21 June 2011. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  10. ^ Rajendra Saxena. "Details of New line, Gauge conversion & Doubling constructed after independence & in progress on Indian Railways". item No. 18. irse. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  11. ^ "Electrification of 809 route Kilometers of Barauni–Katihar-Guwahati section of East Central and Northeast Frontier Railways". Press Information Bureau, 7 February 2008. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  12. ^ "Railway electrification project to touch North East soon". Business Standard, 23 August 2011. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 

External links

  • Trains at Barauni
  • Trains at Katihar
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