Bacon, Egg and Cheese sandwich

A bacon, egg and cheese sandwich is a breakfast sandwich popular in the United States, made with bacon, eggs (typically fried or scrambled), cheese and bread, which may be buttered and toasted. Many similar sandwiches exist, substituting alternate meat products for the bacon or using different varieties of cheese or bread. The sandwich is often served as a breakfast item with coffee. BEC is sometimes used as an acronym for the sandwich,[1] as is BE&C.

Variations

Many variations of the sandwich exist. Common choices for cheese include American, cheddar, and Swiss. The bacon can be substituted with many other types of preserved or seasoned meat like breakfast sausage, ham, back bacon, or pork roll. Various types of bread roll can be used as the bread for the sandwich, such as a croissant, bagel or kaiser roll. Tomato is sometimes used as an addition,[2] and more robust version includes a hash brown. The dish can also be served as a burrito or taco.[3]

A typical sandwich with these ingredients has about 20 grams of fat and 350 calories.[3][4] A version has been adapted to make a low carbohydrate meal.[5][6] In the United States, the bacon egg and cheese sandwich has also been modified into a prepackaged food product as a Hot Pocket (170 calories and 7 grams of fat) and a Lean Pocket (150 calories and 4.5 grams of fat).[3]

In the United States, Sonic Drive-In offers a bacon egg and cheese "toaster".[7] Arby’s offers a "Sourdough Bacon, Egg & Swiss" with 500 calories and 29 grams of fat.[8] Burger King serves up a "Croissan'wich with Bacon, Egg & Cheese" (360 calories and 22 grams of fat) as well as a "Double Croissan'wich with Sausage, Bacon, Egg & Cheese" (610 calories and 46 grams of fat).[8] In New Zealand and some parts of Australia a "Massive McMuffin" is offered with ketchup, bacon, egg, American cheese and two sausage patties. For a time, Burger King offered an "Enormous Omelet Sandwich" with two egg patties, two strips of bacon, two slices of cheese and a sausage patty.

See also

Food portal

References

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