World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

3-Methoxy-4-methylamphetamine

 

3-Methoxy-4-methylamphetamine

3-Methoxy-4-methylamphetamine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-(3-methoxy-4-methylphenyl)propan-2-amine
Clinical data
Legal status
Routes Oral
Identifiers
CAS number  N
ATC code None
PubChem
ChemSpider  YesY
ChEMBL  YesY
Chemical data
Formula C11H17NO 
Mol. mass 179.258 g/mol
 N   

3-Methoxy-4-methylamphetamine (MMA) is an David E. Nichols as a non-neurotoxic MDMA analogue in 1991,[2] and has subsequently been sold as a designer drug on the internet since the late 2000s (decade).[4]

In animal studies, MMA fully substitutes for MDMA and MBDB, partially substitutes for LSD, and does not substitute for amphetamine.[2] Additionally, it has been shown to potently inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and does not produce serotonergic neurotoxicity in rodents.[2] These data appear to confer a profile of MMA as a selective serotonin releasing agent (SSRA) and 5-HT2A receptor agonist.[2]

At high doses, such as 120 mg, the effects are psychedelic (comparable to DOM) but can be dysphoric and very long-lived.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Ho BT, McIsaac WM, An R, et al. (January 1970). "Analogs of alpha-methylphenethylamine (amphetamine). I. Synthesis and pharmacological activity of some methoxy and/or methyl analogs". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 13 (1): 26–30.  
  2. ^ a b c d e Johnson MP, Frescas SP, Oberlender R, Nichols DE (May 1991). "Synthesis and pharmacological examination of 1-(3-methoxy-4-methylphenyl)-2-aminopropane and 5-methoxy-6-methyl-2-aminoindan: similarities to 3,4-(methylenedioxy)methamphetamine (MDMA)". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 34 (5): 1662–8.  
  3. ^ de Zorzi C, Cavalli A, Un nuovo allucinogeno: la MMA (p-metil-m-metossi anfetamina) Zacchia. 1974;49 (1) p.58-68
  4. ^ "Bluelight Forums - MMA - 3-MeO-4-Me-Amphetamine". 
  5. ^ Ann Shulgin; Alexander Shulgin (1991). Pihkal: A Chemical Love Story. Transform Press.  


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.