World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester

Article Id: WHEBN0015906728
Reproduction Date:

Title: Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Dunham Massey, Wigan, List of Scheduled Monuments in Greater Manchester, List of churches in Greater Manchester, Whitworth Hall
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester

The Barton Swing Aqueduct in the closed position

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest".[1] In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[2] rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

The metropolitan county of Greater Manchester is made up of 10 metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan. The Grade II* buildings in each borough are listed separately. Manchester, the world's first industrialised city,[3] has 77 of Greater Manchester's 238 Grade II* listed buildings, the highest number of any borough. Bury has the least, with only eight. The River Irwell forms the boundary between Salford and Trafford, so one listed structure, the Barton Swing Aqueduct, has been listed under both Salford and Trafford.

Most of Greater Manchester's listed buildings date from the Victorian and Edwardian periods.[1] According to an Association for Industrial Archaeology publication, Greater Manchester is "one of the classic areas of industrial and urban growth in Britain, the result of a combination of forces that came together in the 18th and 19th centuries: a phenomenal rise in population, the appearance of the specialist industrial town, a transport revolution, and weak local lordship".[4] Much of the region, historically a part of Lancashire, was at the forefront of textile manufacturing from the early 19th century until the early 20th century, and the county includes several former mill towns.[5][6] Greater Manchester has a wealth of industrial heritage, represented by industrial architecture found throughout the county,[6] but many of its Grade II* listed buildings have a municipal, ecclesiastic or other cultural heritage.

It is uncertain which Grade II* listed structure in Greater Manchester is the oldest. However, three of the 238 buildings date from the 13th century, making them the oldest. Brandlesholme Old Hall in Bury was once an open-hall cruck-framed house, originating in the 13th century, although altered and extended in the 16th century and completely remodelled in 1849.[7] The Church of St Chad in Rochdale has a 13th-century tower (with an 1870 extension).[8] And Mab's Cross in Wigan, the stump of a boundary cross, is probably 13th century in origin.[9] The newest Grade II* listed building in Greater Manchester is the Daily Express Building, designed by Sir Owen Williams in 1939.[10] Due to the heavy impact of the Industrial Revolution on Greater Manchester, just under half of its Grade II* listed buildings (112, 47%) were completed in the 19th century.

Bolton

Bury

Manchester

Oldham

Rochdale

Salford

Stockport

Tameside

Trafford

Wigan

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j The date given is the date used by Historic England as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building/ scheduled monument by Historic England.

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ McNeil and Nevell (2000), A Guide to the Industrial Archaeology of Greater Manchester, p. 2.
  5. ^
  6. ^ a b McNeil and Nevell (2000), A Guide to the Industrial Archaeology of Greater Manchester, p. 2–3.
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^
  21. ^
  22. ^
  23. ^
  24. ^
  25. ^
  26. ^
  27. ^
  28. ^
  29. ^
  30. ^
  31. ^
  32. ^
  33. ^
  34. ^
  35. ^
  36. ^
  37. ^
  38. ^
  39. ^
  40. ^
  41. ^
  42. ^
  43. ^
  44. ^
  45. ^
  46. ^
  47. ^
  48. ^
  49. ^
  50. ^
  51. ^
  52. ^
  53. ^
  54. ^
  55. ^
  56. ^
  57. ^
  58. ^
  59. ^
  60. ^
  61. ^
  62. ^
  63. ^
  64. ^
  65. ^
  66. ^
  67. ^
  68. ^
  69. ^
  70. ^
  71. ^
  72. ^
  73. ^
  74. ^
  75. ^ a b
  76. ^
  77. ^
  78. ^
  79. ^
  80. ^
  81. ^
  82. ^
  83. ^
  84. ^
  85. ^
  86. ^
  87. ^
  88. ^
  89. ^
  90. ^
  91. ^
  92. ^
  93. ^
  94. ^
  95. ^ The Buildings of England - Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East, p. 498
  96. ^
  97. ^
  98. ^
  99. ^
  100. ^
  101. ^
  102. ^
  103. ^
  104. ^
  105. ^
  106. ^
  107. ^
  108. ^
  109. ^
  110. ^ The Barton Swing Aqueduct crosses the Manchester Ship Canal and is in the boroughs of both Salford and Trafford.
  111. ^
  112. ^
  113. ^
  114. ^
  115. ^
  116. ^
  117. ^
  118. ^
  119. ^
  120. ^
  121. ^
  122. ^
  123. ^
  124. ^ a b c
  125. ^
  126. ^
  127. ^
  128. ^
  129. ^
  130. ^
  131. ^
  132. ^
  133. ^
  134. ^
  135. ^
  136. ^
  137. ^
  138. ^
  139. ^
  140. ^
  141. ^
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.