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Education


Education as a category refers to the formal process by which society deliberately transmits its accumulated knowledge, skills, customs and values from one generation to another.

 
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From the Mountains to the Sea-Early Hawaiian Life

By: Julie Stewart Williams

This book is one of a series originally written by faculty in a Kamehameha reading program. The books were designed to increase students' reading skills and their knowledge of Hawaiian history and culture by focusing on topics such as the Hawaiian monarchy. Some of these books have been translated from their original English into Hawaiian through the efforts of the staff of the Kamehameha Schools Hawaiian Studies Institute. We are pleased at the reception both the Eng...

Try to imagine Hawai’i five hundred years ago. What do you suppose life in the islands was like then? How do you think people survived? From the Mountains to the Sea: Early Hawaiian Life will help answer these questions. It will give us a glimpse of our early Hawaiian ancestors. We will see where they lived and how they lived. We will learn about their close ties to nature. By observing their relationship with this natural environment we will discover that these ea...

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E Pa'A Pono (Hold Fast)

By: Heitiare K. Kammerer

Na Kamalei—He Papahana Ho‘ona‘auao Kamali‘i ia no loko mai o kekahi hui ku i ka ‘auhau ‘ole no ka ‘oiwi Hawai‘i. Aia kekahi i loko o keia ‘ahahui he polokalamu ho‘ona‘auao akua/kamali‘i no ka lawelawe ‘ana i na ‘ohana o Ko‘olauloa ma ka mokupuni o O‘ahu. Me ke kokua kala ‘ana o ka Administration for Native Americans no ka pahana Na Kama o Ko‘olauLoa , ha‘awi keia ‘ahahui i na ‘ohana i mau lawelawe ‘ohana a me na ha‘awina ho‘ona‘auao ho‘i no ka ulu maika‘i ‘ana o ke kei...

‘O na ‘ahahui kaiaulu o Ko‘olauloa me ko lakou mau haku puke ko makou mau kumu waiwai. Na lakou no i kako‘o i ka holomua ‘ana o ka heluhelu a me ke kakau ‘ana o na po‘e keiki ‘oiwi me ko lakou mau po‘e ‘ohana. Ua hana like pu makou ma ka haku ‘ana i keia mau puke a ka‘ana like pu makou i na mana‘o like ‘ole ma ke a‘o aku, a‘o mai. He kupaianaha keia mau puke, no ka mea, na makou, na kupa o Ko‘olauloa i ha‘i i keia mau mo‘olelo. Ua pa‘i ‘ia akula kela puke keia puk...

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Feather Work

By: William T. Brigham

The love of personal decoration appears very early in the history of the human race. When the fierce struggle for existence and the pursuit of food and shelter allowed time for the consideration of family, the keen hunters must have learned many a lesson from the beasts of the field and forest,—not less from the birds of the air, of the processes of Nature which Mr. Darwin has called sexual selection. That any savage ever reasons out these processes cannot be believed...

The lion's mane, the tiger's skin, the eagle's feather were man's earliest adornment, and it is not improbable that woman in humble emulation of her lord made for herself clusters and bands of flowers or fruits, while the dwellers on the ocean shores soon took the sea-shells cast on the sandy beach. The warrior of the far North has the eagle and hawk from which to borrow, and the ancient war dress of a Mandan chief was decorated with spoil of these and other birds; but ...

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First Book in Hawaiian

By: Marc Atcherly

The Legislature of the Territory of Hawaii in the session of 1923 passed Act 243, entitled “an act to provide for the preparation and publication of a school text book in the Hawaiian language. ” In pursuance of this act, Governor Lawrence M. Judd arranged with the Hawaiian Board of Missions for the publication of the manuscript which had been prepared by Mrs. Mary H. Atcherley. Other docuíments had been submitted, but it was felt that Mrs. Atcherley’s contribution...

Language is used to express ideas. A Sentence is the full expression of a single idea. A Language is learned by memorizing a number of Sentences and acquiring a vocabulary of some hundreds of words. Now, since a Sentence is composed of words, and words are “parts off speech,” and their proper arrangement constitutes a Sentence, Grammar must be included in any complete System of Instruction. Consequently, the plan here adopted is the simultaneous teaching of Words, Se...

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A Gazetteer of the Territory of Hawaii 1935

By: John Wesley Coulter, Ph. D.

In the following index of the islands of the Territory of Hawaii and vicinity and the geographical features of those islands, the aríchipelago is divided into three groups, namely: (1) the Main Group, comprising all islands from Hawaii to Niihau, including islets lying offshore from the main islands; (2) the Leeward Islands from Ni-lioa. to kure, consisting of a chain of islands, atolls, and shoals, exítending from beyond Kauai west-north-west for 1,100 miles; and (8) Ot...

In collecting the names from the primary source, the thirty-three maps and quadrangles of the islands, except those of the re-survey of Oahu, were marked in rectangles, the sides of which were one minute long, and the named geographic features located to the nearíest minute of latitude and longitude. The names are'listed exactly as they are spelled on the quadrangles and maps. No decisions have been made as to whether the names are correct. However, the Haíwaiian place n...

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Grammar of the Hawaiian Language

By: L. Andrews

Language, in all parts of the earth, is the principal medium of communication between men. It is employed only by rational beings, or such as to have the faculty of speech; that is, of uttering articulate sounds. Language is the medium of communicating ideas in two ways: 1st, by the use of the voice in the utterance of articulate sounds termed words; 2nd, by characters representing articulate sounds. The former is addressed to the ear, the latter to the eye. Language...

Grammar is a written account of the principles used in writing or speaking a language. A Hawaiian Grammar is an explanation of the rules and principles used by Hawaiians in speaking and writing their language. Grammatical Treatises are usually divided into several parts, viz. Orthography, Etymology, Syntax and Prosody. Orthography treats of letters and their formation into words. Etymology treats of words and their changes in relation to each other. Syntax teache...

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Hawaiian Grammar

By: Samuel H. Elbert

The "Notes on Hawaiian Grammar" included in the first three editions of the Hawaiian-English Dictionary have in this volume been revised and expanded. The original notes were written during the early 1950s, and since that time the number of students of Polynesian languages has increased considerably, with resulting increase in knowledge of these languages. This new Grammar, therefore, presents an approach rather different from the previous one; however, it is not couch...

The English translations of illustrative sentences may in some instances seem awkward, but close translations are helpful to students. Not every possible translation of an illustrative sentence is given. For example, ia, meaning both 'he' and 'she', is usually translated 'he' to avoid the awkward 'he/she' and 'him/her'. Since Hawaiian is mainly tenseless and English is decidedly not, translations perforce included tense, but the alternative tenses are not given for ev...

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Hawaiian Canoe-Building Traditions

By: Naomi N. Y. Chun

Among the outstanding achievements of the Hawaiian people was their skill in building a wide variety of efficient and well-crafted canoes. Distinguished scholar Dr. Donald D. Kilolani Mitchell cites the Hawaiian canoe as being a "cultural peak" in the history of Hawaii. Hawaiian Canoe-Building Traditions was created to highlight this particular "cultural peak." Canoe building was, and remains, a proud art in Hawaii. This combination textbook/workbook emphasizes the step...

The waa, or the canoe, played a very important role in Hawaii's history and traditional lifestyle. When the early settlers migrated from Kahiki to Hawaii, they journeyed by double-hulled canoes (waa kaulua). Upon their arrival, they continued to build and use canoes for work, travel, and play. Having found an abundance of very tall and large koa trees (scientific name: Acacia koa) in the islands, the settlers began the practice of making canoes from single, hollowed-out...

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He Aha Kau

By: Eve Furchgott

Kakoo a paipai ka Hale Kuamoo-Kikowaena Olelo Hawaii i ka hookumu ana i ka olelo Hawaii, o ia ka olelo kaiapuni o na kula, o ke aupuni, o na oihana like ole, i lohe ia mai hoi ka olelo Hawaii mai o a o o Hawaii Pae Aina. Na ka Hale Kuamoo e hoomohala nei i na haawina e pono ai ka holomua o ka olelo Hawaii ana ma na ano poaiapili like ole e like hoi me ka haawina olelo Hawaii no na kula olelo Hawaii, na papahana kakoo kumu, ka nupepa o Na Maka O Kana, a me ka puke weheweh...

This book teaches you beginner gramma in Hawaiian language through pictures, basic words, and phrases.

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Ke Ao Heluhelu

By: J. S. Green

Na ka poe misionari i haawi mai ia'u i keia hana, o ka hooponopo i keia Buke Heluhelu i mea e pono ai na kula. A, no kuu pilikia i ka hana e ae, haawi hou aku' au ia Mr. Green ma Wailuku nana no i hooponopono. Ua unuhiia noloko mai o ka Olelo Akamai a Solomona, a me ka Mooolelo Holoholona, a me ka Hoikehonua i paiia mamua,a me ka Lama Hawaii, a me ke Kumu Hawaii, a me ka Mooolelo no Hawaii nei. Ua nui na mea i aoia ma keia buke, i mea e maikai ai ka heluhelu ana a i mea ...

Ao heluhelu; he bukeia e ao ai i na haumana e heluhelu.

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He Wahi Mo'Olelo No Keauhou a Me Na Wahi Pana Ma Laila : A Collect...

By: Kepa Maly

The following collection of archival and oral historical records was researched and compiled by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, at the request of Ms. Ulalia Woodside, Land Legacy Resources Manager (Land Assets Division), of Kamehameha Schools. The research focused on two primary sources of information—historical literature, and summary of oral historical interviews with kupuna and kama?aina, known to be familiar with the history of Keauhou, and neighboring lands in the Distric...

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Hiki Ke A'O E Pili Ana I Ka I'A

By: Leilani Franco

Kakoo a paipai ka Hale Kuamoo-Kikowaena Olelo Hawaii i ka hookumu ana i ka olelo Hawaii, o ia ka olelo kaiapuni o na kula, o ke aupuni, o na oihana like ole, i lohe ia mai hoi ka olelo Hawaii mai o a o o Hawaii Pae Aina. Na ka Hale Kuamoo e hoomohala i na haawina e pono ai ka holomua o ka olelo Hawaii ma na ano poaiapili like ole e like hoi me ka haawina olelo Hawaii no na kula olelo Hawaii, na papahana kakoo kumu, ka nupepa o Na Maka O Kana, a me ka puke wehewehe o Mama...

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He Moolelo No Kamapuaa

By: Kuleana Kope

O ka nani o keia moolelo, e ka makamaka heluhelu, aole ia he mea ahuwale. He mea pahaohao kekahi o ka Kamapuaa mau hana i loko no o ke ku ole o ia mau hana i na loina me na kuluma o kona wa. Peia paha e ike ai kanaka e no ke ao akua mai o Kama, a ua paa ia ia ka mana hookalakupua e lanakila ai o ia ma luna o na hoa paio ikaika he nui wale. O na wahi kinaunau nae o Kamapuaa kekahi mea e hoihoi pu ai ka moolelo ia kakou kanaka. Ma kona hanau ia ana, he kino kaula kona, aol...

Eia la, ke panee ia aku nei keia moolelo no loko mai o na ulu ohia loloa ma kai mai o Panaewa a i uka la o Waiakea, he kaao no Kamapuaa, he kupua e kaulana nei a puni ka paeaina i kana mau hana kupaianaha me kona ano he akua puaa ku i ke aiwaiwa. No Kamapuaa, he kupua, he puaa, he kanaka; ike ia i loko ona na ano no hoi i paa i loko o kakou pakahi a pau, na hemahema me na ikaika o ke kanaka, he akamai, he kolohe, he apiki, he ikaika ma ke kaua, he aea, he pakela ai (he a...

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Ka'Ehuikimanoopu'Uloa

By: William Henery

The Hale Kuamoo–Hawaiian Language Center supports and encourages expansion of Hawaiian language as the medium of education, business, government, and other contexts of social life in Hawaii. The Center provides professional and material resources necessary to address this goal including educational support in the development of curriculum materials for Hawaiian medium education, teacher training, Na Maka O Kana Hawaiian language newspaper, and the Mamaka Kaiao dictionary...

He wahi manao hoolauna keia no ka poe e heluhelu mai ana i keia mookaao i hooili ia mai ia kakou e na kupuna o Hawaii nei. Ua hanau ia mai ka mea nona keia moolelo, o ia hoi o Kaehuikimanoopuuloa, ma ke ano he mano, a ua kapa ia kona inoa ma muli o ka lauoho ehu o ke akua mano kaulana o Puuloa, o Kaahupahau. A ia oukou e heluehlu ana i keia mookaao no Kaehuiki a me kona mau hoaalii mano, e kupu mai ana paha he mau ninau no ua poe mano nei. No ka mea, ua kapa ia kona ino...

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He Moolelo Kaao No Iwa

By: Kapulani Antonio

The Hale Kuamoo–Hawaiian Language Center supports and encourages expansion of Hawaiian language as the medium of education, business, government, and other contexts of social life in Hawaii. The Center provides professional and material resources necessary to address this goal including educational support in the development of curriculum materials for Hawaiian medium education, teacher training, Na Maka O Kana Hawaiian language newspaper, and the Mamaka Kaiao dictionary...

Ua pai ia He Moolelo Kaao no Iwa i ka nupepa Ka Hoku o Hawaii i ka makahiki 1908. A ua pai hou ia me ka hahai ana i ke kulekele no ka hoano hou, ka hooponopono a me ka loihape ana e ka Hale Kuamoo. O kekahi laana ka waiho ana i na huaolelo i hoomaaka ia ma ke ano he hoike manao o ka mea kakau. Ua hookomo ia hoi ka manao o ka hoano hou ma na kuhia o lalo. Eia hou, na ka mea hoano hou no i haku i na olelo ma na kahaapo kihikihi [ ] ma muli o ka pelu ia o ke kope kumu. Ua...

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Kumu Kou

By: Larry Kimura

I ke au kahiko e noho ana he makua kane me kana keiki o Kinoulu ka inoa. Ua noho laua ma Kekaha i ka mokupuni o Hawai i a he lawai a ka laua hana. He holo laua i ka moana i na la a pau ma luna o ka wa a e kukaula ai. O ke kukaula kekahi ano lawai a ana me ke aho a me ka makau. I ka hiki ana o Kinoulu me kona makua kane i ke ko a i a, o ia ho i kahi e noho ai ka i a, he kukaula ka laua hana. Ki i mau ia na pohaku nunui kupono e Kinoulu a waiho ia i luna o ka wa a. Ua ho o...

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Ka Mo'Olelo O Keahiakahoe

By: Pelehonuamea Harman

E na makamaka o ka olelo makuahine mai Hawaii Nui Kuauli a i Niihau o ka Ua Naulu aloha pumehana kakou. Ke panee nei keia moolelo i mua o oukou, i mua o ka maka o na kanaka e kuupau nei i ka hooko i ka iini nui o kakou, o ia no ka hooikaika hou i ka olelo Hawaii. He mahele nui ia o ko kakou Mauli Ola Hawaii. Ma loko o keia moolelo i hoike ia ai kekahi ano kupono a kupono ole o ke kanaka ma ka wa kahiko. E maliu aku kakou i keia haawina, no ka mea, he mea no ia i pili i n...

O Keaahala ka aina. He wahi ka ia ma uka o Kaneohe. Ma laila i noho ai o Kahoe. He mahiai o Kahoe e noho ana me kana ohana ma ke alo o na pali kunihi o Koolau Poko.

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Moku Ka Pawa

By: Keoni Kelekolio

E na makamaka pulama mau i ka olelo makuahine e noho mai nei mai kaulana a ka La i Kumukahi a i komohana a ka La i Lehua, welina me ke aloha. O ka La ka mea e malamalama ai ke ao; mahalo ia kona malamalama, o ia kekahi mea nui ma ko kakou ola ana. O ka malamalama, olelo ia ua like ia me ka naauao, a ua laha ia manao i loko o na mele a me na olelo noeau. Eia nae, pehea hoi ka wa loaa ole o ka malamalama He aha ka manao kuuna Hawaii no ka po Ma ke mele koihonua...

O Kona, ka aina o ke kai maokioki e waiho kunihi ana i ka pa olu mai a ka makani Eka, o ia kahi i noho ai ke alii, o Makalii kona inoa. O ke ano o ia alii, he pi a he makona. Aole e nalo ka iwi o ke alii ino, o ko ke alii maikai ke nalo. Upu ae kona manao ino e pilikia ai ka aina, ka poe, a me na holoholona. O kona manao, o ia ke kaili ana i ka ai a pau a nele loa ka aina. I mea e hooko ai i kana mea kolohe i hooholo ae ai, hoiliili aku o ia i na ai a pau o ka aina, o ke...

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Mo'Olelo Polenesia

By: Kapulani Antonio

Olelo Hoolauna He mea nui ka moolelo i na lahui a pau o ka honua nei, no ka mea, ma o ka moolelo e ola ai ka hana a me ke ano o ka noonoo ana o ka poe e noho ana ma mua. Ma ka moolelo e hoike ia ai ke ano a me ka manao o na kupuna. Ao ka moolelo i ka pono a me ka pono ole. He kokua ka moolelo i ke kukulu ana i ke kuanaike ao. O ke kuanaike ao ka mea a ke kanaka e ike ai ke nana a noonoo aku i ke ao nei. Pili no ke kuanaike ao i ke ano o ka hanai ia ana o kekahi kanaka. O...

Ua noonoo ia no paha o Aotearoa he mahele o Pelekane, aka, ma mua o ka noho ana o ka Pakeha (ka Haole hoi) i laila, ua noho ia ia aina e ka poe Maori, he poe Polenesia. Ua pili no ka Hawaii me ka Maori. He pili no ma na mea hou e like me ke ku ana o ka poe oiwi no ka hoihoi ana i ka mana aupuni ia lakou i ola no na moomeheu o ka lahui. A he pili no ma na mea kahiko mai ka wa ma mua mai. O ka pili o na olelo elua kekahi mea e ike koke ia, oiai he mau huapalapala...

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He Hoakakaolelo No Na Huaolelo Beritania (A Dictionary of English ...

By: Lahainaluna

The design of this work is primarily to aid Hawaiian youth of intelligence in acquiring a knowledge of the English language; and it is intended, in connection with the grammar, to furnish them adequate help, under the direction of the living teacher, until they can use the English Dictionary with English definitions. The present is mainly a translation of Webster's Abridgement still more abridged. Many words are thrown out, which are rarely used, and which will never ...

Ua hooliloia na hama i mau haiinoa, penei; quote, quotation; speak, speaker; educate, education; instruct, instruction, instructor, instructress. He poe haiinoa wale no ka nui o na huaolelo nona na leo hope penei, tor, tress, ment, tion, sion, ty, cy, ance, ence, ture, dom, a me ship. Ua hooliloia na haiinoa i mau haiano, penei, Earth, earthly; virtue, virtuous; man, manful; sale, salable, etc. Ua hooliloia na haina i mau haiano; penei, weep, unwept; learn, unlearned;...

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